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Videos uploaded by user “MedPage Today”
ACAAI: New Method Tackles Nonallergic Rhinitis
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com MIAMI BEACH -- Using a novel environmental chamber, researchers are beginning to tease out the factors involved in nonallergic rhinitis, a debilitating condition that affects millions of adults. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 5583 MedPage Today
Physicians React to New FDA Warning on Cipro, Similar Drugs - Medpage Today
 
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In the wake of last week's FDA warning about the danger of using fluoroquinolone antibiotics for uncomplicated infections, many physicians are examining their antibiotic choices. In this video three infectious disease specialists explore why the FDA acted, the impact of the warning, and alternatives to these agents. The participants are: Yi Guo, PharmD, clinical pharmacy manager, infectious diseases, Montefiore Medical Center, New York City Adam L. Hersh, MD, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Victor Nizet, MD, chief, division of host-microbe systems and therapeutics, University of California San Diego Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 4706 MedPage Today
What are the risks and benefits of Tysabri and who should take it?
 
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For more Hot Topics on MedPage Today: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSMultipleSclerosis What are the risks and benefits of the multiple sclerosis (MS) drug natalizumab (Tysabri)? We put the question to four noted MS clinicians: Claire Riley, MD, of Columbia University's Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Center in New York City; John Corboy, MD, of the University of Colorado in Aurora; Andrew Goodman, MD, of the University of Rochester's Multiple Sclerosis Center in New York; and Lana Zhovtis Ryerson, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center's Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center in New York City. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2313 MedPage Today
How do the results of pulmonary function tests influence treatment choices for COPD?
 
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Hot Topics COPD: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSCOPD Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 4533 MedPage Today
At what point do you recommend lung-volume reduction surgery for patients with COPD?
 
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Posted in December 2014 See more Hot Topics COPD: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSCOPD Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 4812 MedPage Today
Principles of Medical Ethics
 
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Transcript: Hello and welcome. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, and this is At Large at MedPage Today. The American Medical Association was founded in 1846 for a number of reasons, including to create a Code of Medical Ethics. It did, and the Code is alive in 2010. I believe that all medical students should memorize these bedrock principles -- a little like many did the Boy Scout Oath and Law. And, I believe that all physicians should follow them scrupulously, lifelong. The Principles are: I. A physician shall be dedicated to providing competent medical care, with compassion and respect for human dignity and rights. II. A physician shall uphold the standards of professionalism, be honest in all professional interactions, and strive to report physicians deficient in character or competence, or engaging in fraud or deception, to appropriate entities. III. A physician shall respect the law and also recognize a responsibility to seek changes in those requirements which are contrary to the best interests of the patient. IV. A physician shall respect the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals, and shall safeguard patient confidences and privacy within the constraints of the law. V. A physician shall continue to study, apply, and advance scientific knowledge, maintain a commitment to medical education, make relevant information available to patients, colleagues, and the public, obtain consultation, and use the talents of other health professionals when indicated. VI. A physician shall, in the provision of appropriate patient care, except in emergencies, be free to choose whom to serve, with whom to associate, and the environment in which to provide medical care. VII. A physician shall recognize a responsibility to participate in activities contributing to the improvement of the community and the betterment of public health. VIII. A physician shall, while caring for a patient, regard responsibility to the patient as paramount. IX. A physician shall support access to medical care for all people. That's it. The Nine. Do them now, and forever. That's my opinion. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, At Large for MedPage Today. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 10686 MedPage Today
Antidepressants in Pregnancy: A Doctor's Opinion
 
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Full story on MedPage Today: http://www.medpagetoday.com/OBGYN/Pregnancy/51902 New research appearing in JAMA shows that the early data suggesting a link between antidepressant use in pregnancy and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), a rare and morbid condition, may be due to confounding. In this video, Perry Wilson, MD, discusses that over-adjustment may have contributed to these results. F. Perry Wilson, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. He earned his BA from Harvard University, graduating with honors with a degree in biochemistry. He then attended Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. From there he moved to Philadelphia to complete his internal medicine residency and nephrology fellowship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During his research time, Dr. Wilson also obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is an accomplished author of many scientific articles and holds several NIH grants. He is a MedPage Today reviewer, and in addition to his video analyses he authors a blog, The Methods Man. You can follow @methodsmanmd on Twitter or like him at www.facebook.com/methodsmanmd. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1327 MedPage Today
ESC: Apixaban May Be the Real Thing
 
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PARIS -- The success of apixaban (Eliquis), a novel oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, in a head-to-head comparison with warfarin for prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, continues to generate buzz at the European Society of Cardiology meeting, and in an exclusive MedPage Today InFocus video report, Elliott Antman, MD, of Harvard Medical School, explains why. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 3601 MedPage Today
50 Pounds Lighter, Reporter Still Belviq Fan
 
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Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 14277 MedPage Today
Improving Diversity in Medicine One Student at a Time
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com NEW YORK -- On Friday nights in the Bronx, college students in the Mentoring in Medicine program gather in the Montefiore Medical Center emergency department. There, Lynne Holden, M.D., co-founder of the program, helps them navigate the obstacles that prevent many minorities from becoming healthcare professionals. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 7100 MedPage Today
A Revolutionary New Potential Treatment for Glioblastoma...
 
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Transcript: Hello. I'm Dr. George Lundberg and this is At Large at MedPage Today. Only rarely does an experienced editor get a spine tingle from a new paper. For the first time ever, today, I predict that a Nobel Prize for medicine will be awarded to J. Martin Brown, DPhil, Oxford, a professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. Professor Brown and his colleagues have discovered and reported a fundamentally new approach to the treatment of solid tumors, beginning with the devastating glioblastoma multiforme. Here is how it goes: Tumors need blood in order to grow. Powerful radiation can kill many cancer cells. It also kills the cancer's blood vessels. How then do any surviving cancer cells regrow after radiation if they have no blood supply? Where do the nutrient blood vessels come from? Professor Brown and colleagues hypothesized that circulating bone marrow derived cells recreated endothelium, and thus vasculogenesis (not angiogenesis), thereby providing the needed blood for the cancer to recur. A drug called plerixafor (AMD3100 or Mozobil) was designated an orphan drug by FDA in 2003 for stem cell transplants and further in 2009 for use in bone marrow transplantation. The investigators took laboratory mice bearing glioblastoma multiforme xenograft tumors and administered therapeutic irradiation. After irradiation, they treated the mice with plerixafor to test whether, by blocking the bone marrow derived cells from becoming endothelial cells, they could prevent them from providing blood nourishment to the irradiated cancer. Bingo. Recurrence of the mouse glioblastomas was completely inhibited throughout the study period, and absent by post-mortem histology. See www.jci.org/articles/view/40283/pdf. It's a long way from mice to humans. But this drug, plerixafor, is already approved for human use. It is said to be benign. Glioblastoma kills several thousand Americans each year, all after "standard of care" has run out of plausible options. Not to mention the countless others of the half million Americans who die from cancer each year, many beginning as solid malignant tumors. Plerixafor should now be tried on humans, after fully informed consent, beginning as Clinical Trials with an N of 1. And the results, whatever they are, should be shared promptly with the broad medical and cancer communities. Find Professor Brown at mbrown@stanford.edu to arrange to try this approach to help your otherwise dying cancer patients. Don't worry about "off-label use"; much of oncology therapy is "off label". Worry most about your patients. And contact me at g.lundberg@medpagetoday.com to arrange for the rapid and dynamic sharing of what you learn from using this drug. We can help you to create a "rapid learning community" around its use. That's my opinion. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, At Large for MedPage Today. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 4833 MedPage Today
Tobacco Settlement Money Being Burned on Unintended Uses
 
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When the major U.S. tobacco companies settled litigation with the states in 1998 in what is known as the Master Settlement Agreement, expectations ran high that the cash windfall would fund tobacco control and cancer research programs. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1294 MedPage Today
APA: Borderline Personality Disorder Often Missed First Time Around
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com SAN FRANCISCO, May 22 -- Borderline personality disorder may be underdiagnosed, according to a study of lifetime diagnostic and treatment histories in patients eventually found to have the disorder. The substantial lag in correct diagnosis frequently results in polypharmacy with medications that are not the most effective for the disorder, David Meyerson, of DePaul University in Chicago, and colleagues reported here at the American Psychiatric Association meeting. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 6862 MedPage Today
ACC: Confirmation that Crestor Regresses Coronary Stenoses
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com Christie M. Ballantyne, M.D., of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston CHICAGO -- Reversal of coronary stenosis seen by intravascular ultrasound after two years of rosuvastatin (Crestor) treatment has been confirmed in the same patients by quantitative coronary angiograpy, researchers reported here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2662 MedPage Today
CHEST: Varenicline Helps Patients with COPD Quit Smoking
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com SAN DIEGO -- Much as it aided the general population of smokers, varenicline (Chantix) helped patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) quit too, a randomized trial showed. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1417 MedPage Today
ACR: Low-Dose Colchicine Reduces Gout Pain in 24 Hours
 
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PHILADELPHIA -- Low dose colchicine (Colcrys) appears to be as effective as high doses of the drug in reducing the pain of gout with fewer advers side effects, a researcher said here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 9991 MedPage Today
How long should corticosteroids be used to treat a COPD exacerbation?
 
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Hot Topics COPD: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSCOPD Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1262 MedPage Today
AAD: Topical Agent Clears Actinic Keratoses
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com MIAMI BEACH -- More than 70% of patients with actinic keratoses had complete or partial clearance of lesions after two applications of a plant-derived topical agent, data from a randomized trial showed. The overall clearance rate included complete resolution of lesions in 27.8% of patients. Most lesions were on the arms or dorsum of the hands, which tend to take a longer time to respond compared with lesions elsewhere on the body. The results corroborate and extend evidence from earlier clinical and preclinical studies indicating that PEP005 (ingenol mebutate) might have considerable activity against actinic keratoses. "Statistically significant actinic keratosis lesion clearance after treatment with ingenol mebutate gel was seen in a very short period of time," Neil Swanson, MD, of the Oregon Health and Science University, reported here at the American Academy of Dermatology meeting. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 4814 MedPage Today
Anatomy of an Epidemic: The Opioid Movie
 
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Driving home from a hunting trip in 2008, Johnny Sullivan called his wife to say he was having trouble staying awake. It was early afternoon, but Mary Lou Sullivan wasn't surprised. Her husband was a long-time user of the narcotic painkiller OxyContin (oxycodone) and frequently dozed off as a side effect, sometimes in the middle of chewing his food. About 10 years earlier, Sullivan and six other chronic pain sufferers had been featured in a Purdue Pharma promotional video for the drug, which Purdue makes. In the video, Sullivan stood at a construction site and talked about how the powerful narcotic eased his back pain and enabled him to run his company again. But a few years after being prescribed OxyContin, Sullivan became addicted to it and other prescription opioids, his family said. That afternoon in 2008, Sullivan, 52, fell asleep while driving and flipped his truck on a country road in North Carolina. "I told my sons one day 'that medicine is going to kill him,'" his widow said. Expanding the market Purdue Pharma's marketing of OxyContin in the late 1990s marked the beginning of the industry's push to promote narcotic painkillers for treatment of chronic pain -- an indication for which both safety and efficacy remain unproven. The first decade of the 21st century has been a good one for makers of prescription painkillers as sales quadrupled from 1999 through 2010, but even in a growth industry OxyContin stands out -- ringing up sales of nearly $3 billion a year. Meanwhile, health officials and regulators have declared a national epidemic as addictions to prescription painkillers have skyrocketed and fatal overdoses have more than tripled in the past decade. A U.S. Senate investigation -- prompted in part by Journal Sentinel/MedPage Today reports -- is probing financial relationships of drug companies and the doctors and organizations that have advocated for use of the drugs. Against that background, the Purdue promotional video emerges as a case study of marketing running ahead of science in the pursuit of the bottom line. The video, made 14 years ago, showcased ordinary people who spoke glowingly of their experiences with OxyContin. · Two of the seven patients died as active opioid abusers. · A third became addicted, suffered greatly, and quit after realizing she was headed for an overdose. · Three patients still say the drug helped them cope with their pain and improved their quality of life. · A seventh patient declined to answer questions. The doctor who not only played a starring role but also recruited his patients for the video now concedes some of his statements caught by the camera went too far. In the video, the doctor, Alan Spanos, MD, a paid specialist in North Carolina, urged doctors to consider prescribing opioids more often. Spanos, who was once a paid promotional speaker for Purdue, now says the video was meant to be one teaching aid used in lectures by experienced doctors. But it was unclear then, and remains unclear now, what percentage of patients benefit from the drugs. "We don't know whether success stories like this are one in five, one in 15, one in 100, one in a thousand", Spanos said in an interview. "They may be quite rare." Nonetheless, the video was distributed to 15,000 doctors as part of a marketing campaign in which Purdue claimed, among other things, that the drug was less addictive and less subject to abuse than other drugs. That wasn't true, and in 2007 The Purdue Frederick Co., an affiliate of Purdue Pharma, agreed to pay $634.5 million in penalties for misbranding the drug as part of a U.S. Justice Department investigation. The sanctions didn't stop the pharmaceutical industry from promoting OxyContin and other narcotics for people with chronic, long-term pain -- a much larger group of potential customers than just those being treated with opioids for intense short-term pain caused by cancer and end of life pain or acute pain caused by severe injuries or surgery. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 5204 MedPage Today
SABCS: Vitamin D Reduces Aromatase Inhibitor Pain
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com SAN ANTONIO -- High-dose vitamin D significantly reduced muscle and joint pain in breast cancer patients treated with the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole (Arimidex), results of a small, randomized clinical trial showed. Weekly vitamin D supplementation led to significant improvement in pain and mobility after two months. The improvement began to dissipate after patients were switched to a monthly supplementation schedule and had largely disappeared by four to six months. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1808 MedPage Today
What is the role of Ampyra in MS patients?
 
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For more Hot Topics on MedPage Today: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSMultipleSclerosis What is the role of dalfampridine (Ampyra) in multiple sclerosis patients? We asked four clinicians to comment: Brian Weinshenker, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; Neil Lava, MD, of Emory University in Atlanta; Andrew Goodman, MD, of the University of Rochester's Multiple Sclerosis Center; and Lana Zhovtis Ryerson, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center's Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center in New York City. The drug boosts walking ability in some patients, our panel agreed; trying it for a few weeks will identify those who respond without marked adverse effects. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1462 MedPage Today
Elective Induction of Labor: Charles Lockwood, MD - Medpage Today
 
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When considering elective induction of labor for pregnant patients, “there will always be room, and should be room for judgment of individual physicians,” says Charles Lockwood, MD, of the University of South Florida in Tampa. In this video, he examines the issue of elective induction compared to expectant management at 39 weeks gestation — including the risks of maternal complications such as stillbirth and need for cesarean section — and discusses the latest research in this field. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 744 MedPage Today
Impact Slides: PARADIGM-HF With Clyde Yancy, MD
 
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Full story on MedPage Today: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/CHF/50620 Why might adding a neprilysin inhibitor to an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) be such an advance in heart failure? Clyde W. Yancy, MD, dissects the PARADIGM-HF trial testing that novel combination, dubbed LCZ696, and how it could fit into clinical practice. Yancy is chief of cardiology and Magerstadt Professor of Medicine at Chicago's Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as well as a past president of the American Heart Association. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 567 MedPage Today
AAN: ALS Linked to Formaldehyde Exposure
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com Marc Weisskopf, Ph.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health CHICAGO, April 17 -- Working with formaldehyde may increase the likelihood of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a researcher said here, but pesticides were exonerated as a factor. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 3547 MedPage Today
Vitamin E Resolves NASH
 
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BOSTON -- Vitamin E may help resolve nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in children -- although it won't lower alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, researchers reported here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1264 MedPage Today
The Proper Study of Me is Me: A Clinical Trial with an N of 1
 
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Editor-at-Large George Lundberg, a strong advocate of large trials and evidence-based medicine, speaks up for smaller numbers in this video essay. Transcript: Hello. I'm Dr George Lundberg and this is At Large at MedPage Today. First, relevant disclosures: I work half-time as editor-at-large at MedPage Today in Little Falls, N.J., and I work half-time as editor-in-chief of Cancer Commons from CollabRx in Palo Alto. Many of you know that I was the editor at JAMA for 17 years and at Medscape for 10 years. You also know that I have been a strong advocate for evidence-based medicine (EBM) for decades and have trumpeted the large randomized controlled clinical trial as the "gold standard" for EBM. That was in good faith and was the best that we could do for populations with diseases that we believed were reasonably homogeneous. Of course, clinical trial results are reported as medians and ranges, and there are often discordant results amongst clinical trials and thus the need for meta-analyses to work out the differences. And there are always those pesky outliers and what to do with them. And then came the human genome project, and I thought when we understood the genes, medical science would become a lot simpler. How wrong I was. We now know that heterogeneity may be the rule and not the outlier; that it may make no sense to lump patients with diseases that are heterogeneous by genetic mutations and metabolic molecular pathways into groups for large clinical trials. The great poet Alexander Pope said that "the proper study of mankind is man." Okay, I'll admit that is sexist language, man should be "human." But I say that "the proper study of me is me." And further, if I were to get a cancer, the proper study of my cancer would be my cancer, a clinical trial with an N of 1, me. That's my opinion. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, At Large with MedPage Today. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1157 MedPage Today
Researchers Debate Ezetimibe (Vytorin) ENHANCE Trial -Part 1
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com Evan A. Stein, M.D., Ph.D., Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center in Cincinnati Allen J. Taylor, M.D., of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington Controversy over the ENHANCE trial continued despite lengthy presentations at the American College of Cardiology meeting earlier this month. In this exclusive video report MedPage Today talks in-depth with two researchers about ezetimibe, LDL, and clinical implications of the trial. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2871 MedPage Today
Eye Movements May Be Early Marker of Autism
 
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Young children's patterns of eye tracking while watching a short video were associated with likelihood of having autism spectrum disorder, a pilot study found. An autism risk index based on eye movements was validated in two cohorts -- an initial and replication sample -- led by Thomas Frazier, PhD, of the Cleveland Clinic. Results were published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. In this video, Frazier discusses the details of the study, the next steps in further development of the autism risk index, and its potential use in clinical practice. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2474 MedPage Today
Tai Chi Relieves Fibromyalgia
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com/Rheumatology/Fibromyalgia/21749 The mind-body activity of tai chi improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia without any safety concerns, a single-center, randomized controlled trial showed. Compared with an educational and stretching intervention, tai chi led to a greater overall improvement in fibromyalgia after 12 weeks, according to Chenchen Wang, MD, MPH, of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2650 MedPage Today
SIR: Varicocele Embolization Reduces Pain and Infertility
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com Amol Mujoomdar, M.D., of the University of Toronto WASHINGTON -- A minimally invasive varicocele embolization procedure reduces pain and improves sperm count, according to a retrospective study reported here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 29750 MedPage Today
ASCO: Two-Year Survival Seen with Sutent in Kidney Cancer
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com Robert A. Figlin, M.D., City of Hope, Duarte, Calif. CHICAGO -- In patients with treatment-naive advanced renal cell carcinoma, treatment with sunitinib (Sutent) more than doubled progression-free survival compared with interferon alfa. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 3673 MedPage Today
AAO: Gene Therapy Restores Partial Vision
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com SAN FRANCISCO -- Gene therapy to counteract retinal degeneration from a rare inherited sight disorder improved vision in all patients, including one child who recovered nearly normal light sensitivity. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2603 MedPage Today
What are the reasons to choose an inhaler that combines a LAMA/LABA compared to ICS/LABA?
 
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Hot Topics COPD: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSCOPD Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1162 MedPage Today
Serum Imatinib (Gleevec) Levels Predict GIST Response
 
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George D. Demetri, M.D., Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston http://www.medpagetoday.com ORLANDO -- Higher circulating levels of imatinib (Gleevec) correlated with better clinical responses in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), but proper initial doses were unpredictable, a researcher reported here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2648 MedPage Today
ASCO: Avastin Alone Shows Edge in Recurrent Glioblastoma
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, M.D., American Cancer Society CHICAGO -- For refractory glioblastoma, second-line bevacizumab (Avastin) as monotherapy has been associated with a 28% response rate and an overall survival edge, albeit nonsignificant, over the agent plus irinotecan (Camptosar). Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2490 MedPage Today
Laughing Gas Bringing Smiles to More Women in Labor
 
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Nitrous oxide is easing the pain of labor at only a few centers in the U.S., but that may be changing as a grassroots movement driven by nurse midwives pushes to give women this intermediate option short of an epidural. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2983 MedPage Today
What are the risks and benefits of the oral medications and who should take them?
 
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Hot Topics on MedPage Today: http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSMultipleSclerosis What are the risks and benefits of the oral medications for multiple sclerosis and who should take them? We asked three academic experts to comment. They are: Jerry S. Wolinsky, MD, of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston; Jonathan Howard, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center's Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center in New York City; and Claire Riley, MD, of Columbia University's Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Center in New York City. They agreed that each of the three current oral products -- fingolimod (Gilenya), teriflunomide (Aubagio), and dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera) -- has its own place in the armamentarium. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1078 MedPage Today
Endometriosis Has Major Effect on Lives of Women
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com/OBGYN/GeneralOBGYN/20245 NEW YORK -- Uncertainty about its cause, a lack of effective prevention or cure, and delays in diagnosis and treatment all contribute to a major societal impact of endometriosis, according to research presented here. It is estimated that about 176 million women ages 15 to 49 worldwide, and eight million in the U.S., have the painful condition, Lone Hummelshoj, secretary general of the World Endometriosis Society, reported at a half-day conference hosted by the Endometriosis Foundation of America. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 479 MedPage Today
ACR: Pegloticase Promising for Treatment-Resistant Gout
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com/ John S. Sundy, M.D., Ph.D., Duke in Durham, N.C. SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 27 -- Severe refractory gout may respond to intravenous infusion of the investigational agent pegloticase (Puricase), researchers found. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1289 MedPage Today
Melanoma: Is Keytruda Game-Changing Therapy?
 
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Pembrolizumab is one of a new class of "checkpoint inhibitors" touted as breakthrough therapy for advanced melanoma. In this 150-second analysis, MedPage Today clinical reviewer F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE breaks down the action of the drug, and synthesizes the recent efficacy data. F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE, is an assistant professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. He earned his BA from Harvard University, graduating with honors with a degree in biochemistry. He then attended Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. From there he moved to Philadelphia to complete his internal medicine residency and nephrology fellowship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During his post graduate years, he also obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is an accomplished author of many scientific articles and holds several NIH grants. He is a MedPage Today reviewer, and in addition to his video analyses, he authors a blog, The Methods Man. You can follow @methodsmanmd on Twitter. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 978 MedPage Today
It's Not Which Stent; It's Why Stent?
 
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Hello and welcome. I'm Dr. George Lundberg and this is At Large at MedPage Today. In 1911, George Bernard Shaw famously wrote "All professions are a conspiracy against the laity". One hundred years later, in 2011, I write "the MBA has done more to harm the public through bottom-line hospital administration than have many dread diseases". As an example, the continuing saga of this stent, that stent, the other stent placed into as many coronary and other arteries as often and as fast as possible does show some signs of waning. See the New York Times url: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/06/health/06stent.html One of my favorite journalists, Maggie Mahar, has been writing about the stent problem as well as many other overuses of TOL (technology for lucre), in columns and her book, Money Driven Medicine, for many years. See now this url: http://www.healthbeatblog.com/2010/12/stent-scandal-a-shocking-story-but-not-news-.html And Dr. Nortin Hadler, a professor at UNC in Chapel Hill has a number of books that document the mass misbehavior of American medicine at large for many years. See now this url. http://www.healthbeatblog.com/2010/12/opinion-some-common-stents.html The problems conclude that the overuse and misuse of medical procedures is so widespread as to now be accepted as "conventional wisdom" and institutionalized as "standard of practice". The academic medical centers are the worst because they posture as presenting the best medical science while practicing as the largest generator of the most revenue for their institutions. And they thereby teach the students and residents to emulate them, doing with great competence loads of procedures that don't need to be done at all. For my take on how different actions such as those Maggie, Nortin, and I are advocating here would save vast sums of money see this url. http://www.thehealthcareblog.com/the_health_care_blog/2009/08/how-to-rein-in-medical-costs-right-now.html If you dont believe me, read the links above as "assigned homework". And, for the best science on use of stents that should best inform the decisions for you and your patients, look yourself to the clinical trials called RITA-2; BARI-2D; OAT; and COURAGE. Don't continue to be entrapped by the AMMM, the American Medical Marketing Machine. That's my opinion. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, At Large for MedPage Today. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 806 MedPage Today
Murder in Your Hospital
 
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Transcript: Hello and Welcome. I'm Dr. George Lundberg and this is At Large at MedPage Today. How many murders did you have in your hospital last year? Did they involve sporadic or serial killers? What? You don't know? You really haven't thought that much about it? I'm not surprised. Chances are you might have had some murders but they were not discovered. I'm not only talking about the angry patient or family member who brings a gun to the ER or a patient room to seek revenge for a bad outcome. Or, bad guys whose assaults just happen to be carried out in hospitals. These are usually obvious, recognized, and widely reported. Ken Kizer and Beatrice Yorker recently have published a paper in a Joint Commission journal discussing the sometimes overlooked patient safety aspects of what the authors term HealthCare Serial Murder (HCSM). Since 1975, at least 35 American healthcare workers have been formally charged with serial murder of patients, marking healthcare workers as an overrepresented occupational group among known serial killers. Some of the worst serial killers of all time have been physicians. Physicians, of course, occupy the uniquely powerful position of enjoying the total trust of patients and their families, easy access to lethal drugs and devices, and the unquestioned authority to sign death certificates. These authors draw distinctions between healthcare serial murder and euthanasia, assisted suicide, politically motivated assaults, or crimes of passion. Of course, the actual numbers of serial killings are unknown, but more than 1,000 suspicious deaths have been linked to persons charged with HCSM. Let's face it. We in healthcare education or practice may select people to work with patients without knowing a great deal about their potential to become killers. Kizer and Yorker make several proposals of how the healthcare community might do a better job of recognizing and preventing HCSM, naming IOM, NQF, and AHRQ as organizations that could review the subject and recommend good processes. Meanwhile, in your own setting, I suggest that you raise your institution's alertness to the potential of healthcare murders as a patient safety issue. One good place to start would be to look at in-hospital deaths. There is a classic way to do this ... it's called ... frequent autopsies. That's my opinion. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, At Large for MedPage Today. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 853 MedPage Today
RNC: Young Internist Rallies Docs Against Trump
 
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CLEVELAND, OHIO— When presidential hopeful Donald Trump takes the stage on the final night of the Republican National Convention, hundreds of physicians, nurses and other young professionals will be outside protesting his nomination. No matter what Trump says or does, he still manages to maintain 38% support in voter opinion surveys, Bryan Hambley, MD, co-founder of Stand Together Against Trump told MedPage Today. Hambley is a fellow in critical care medicine at several Cleveland hospitals. He credits Trump’s 38% floor to our failure as a society to engage in civil discussion. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 252 MedPage Today
Increased Libido One Sexual Benefit of Weight Loss
 
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Sexual function improved significantly and quickly in obese men with type 2 diabetes after weight loss with low-calorie diets, results of a small Australian clinical study showed. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1290 MedPage Today
ACAAI: HAE Drug Offers Faster Relief
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com MIAMI BEACH -- An investigational kallikrein inhibitor may hold out hope for people with acute attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE), a researcher said here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 1098 MedPage Today
RSNA: Dysfunctional Prefrontal Cortex May Preserve Bad Memories
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com/ CHICAGO, Dec. 3 -- Patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders sometimes have difficulty suppressing traumatic memories, researchers said here. The culprit may be a dysfunctional prefrontal cortex, Nivedita Agarwal, M.D., of the University of Udine in Italy, said at the Radiological Society of North America meeting. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2968 MedPage Today
Is There an Alternative Medicine?
 
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Transcript: Hello and welcome. I'm Dr. George Lundberg and this is At Large at MedPage Today. There is no Alternative Medicine. Thus sprach Phil Fontanarosa and me in a 1998 JAMA editorial in the famous theme issue dedicated to Complementary and Alternative Medicine ... hmmm. So I went to Mr. Google in 2010 and entered ... Alternative Medicine ... and clicked -- 41,200,000 results, uuooo; entered Complementary and Alternative Medicine, click -- 3,210,000 results; entered CAM, click -- 191,000,000 results, but that's not fair; CAM can stand for many unrelated topics. Let's try quackery on Mr. Google, click -- "only" 818,000 results. Hmm. Meanwhile, back to that 1998 JAMA editorial. "There is no alternative medicine. There is only scientifically proven, evidence-based medicine supported by solid data or unproven medicine, for which scientific evidence is lacking." But actually there are three piles:You have a test or treatment that has itself been tested and found to be safe and effective. Use it; pay for it.You have a test or treatment that has been found to be unsafe or ineffective. Don't use it; don't pay for it.You have a test or treatment that is scientifically plausible, meaning not preposterous. Test it AND then put it into one of the other two piles. This 1998 JAMA theme issue is credited or blamed by many with opening the door for conversation, study, and serious research. It even promoted respectful consideration of the practices of patients and practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine, since the practices were common, communication almost nonexistent, and understanding veiled at best. What has happened since 1998? A large amount of serious research into previously unstudied practices, largely funded by the NIH, has resulted in many articles in mainstream journals. And, guess what, almost ALL of the long-term traditional CAM practices have been found to be safe but INEFFECTIVE. And what has happened in practice? The American Medical Marketing Machine (AMMM) has done its thing. As the published scientific studies have one by one found CAM practices to be ineffective, more Americans are using CAM than ever. And, such use often is now in mainstream institutions, sterilized, and sold as "Integrative Medicine," which Mr. Google numbers at 1,230,000 results. Looks like there will always be snake oil sellers as long as there are snake oil buyers. That's my opinion. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, At Large for MedPage Today. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 333 MedPage Today
Study Correlates Marijuana Use And Cognitive Decline
 
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Does past exposure to marijuana affect cognitive abilities 25 years down the road? A study appearing in JAMA internal medicine suggests that it may. In this 150 seconds analysis, Dr. F. Perry Wilson looks at the data to clear away the smoke. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 547 MedPage Today
SCCM: Proton Pump Inhibitor Outdoes H2-Blocker in ICU
 
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J. Javier Provencio, M.D., Cleveland Clinic http://www.medpagetoday.com HONOLULU -- Proton pump inhibitors may hold some advantage for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the ICU compared with H2-receptor blockers, researchers said here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 2427 MedPage Today
AAN: High-Dose Vitamin E May Help Alzheimer Patients
 
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http://www.medpagetoday.com Valory Pavlik, Ph.D., of Baylor College of Medicine CHICAGO, April 16 -- High-dose vitamin E supplements do not worsen outcomes in patients with Alzheimer disease and may help, researchers said here. Medpage Today: http://medpagetoday.com Online CME - Continuing medical education: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cme/ Latest medical news: http://www.medpagetoday.com/latest/ The MedPage Today app: iOS: https://goo.gl/JKrkHq Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.medpagetoday.medpage MedPage Today Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MedPageToday Medpage Today on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedPageToday
Views: 902 MedPage Today