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This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is
 
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Just how deep does the ocean go? Way further than you think. This animation puts the actual distance into perspective, showing a vast distance between the waves we see and the mysterious point we call Challenger Deep. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 28903596 Tech Insider
Spray makes anything indestructible
 
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There are a lot of ways to break an egg, but if you want to keep it from breaking, might we suggest Line-X? The company created a spray coating that adheres to nearly anything and is very durable. The spray is mostly designed for use on truck and car parts, but is also used on the walls of The Pentagon in the event of a bombing. The company sent us some everyday items coated in Line-X to see if we could break them, so we gave it a shot. Additional footage by Grace Raver and Corey Protin. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 7073140 Tech Insider
What Would Happen If Humans Tried To Land On Jupiter
 
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The best way to explore a new world is to land on it. That's why humans have sent spacecraft to the Moon, Venus, Mars, Saturn's moon, Titan, and more. But there are a few places in the solar system we will never understand as well as we'd like. One of them is Jupiter. Jupiter is made of mostly hydrogen and helium gas. So, trying to land on it would be like trying to land on a cloud here on Earth. There's no outer crust to break your fall on Jupiter. Just an endless stretch of atmosphere. The big question, then, is: Could you fall through one end of Jupiter and out the other? It turns out, you wouldn't even make it halfway. Here’s what would happen if you tried to land on Jupiter. *It's important to note that we feature the Lunar Lander for the first half of the descent. In reality, the Lunar Lander is relatively delicate compared to, say, NASA's Orion spacecraft. Therefore, the Lunar Lander would not be used for a mission to land on any world that contains an atmosphere, including Jupiter. However, any spacecraft, no matter how robust, would not survive for long in Jupiter, so the Lunar Lander is as good of a choice as any for this hypothetical scenario. First things first, Jupiter's atmosphere has no oxygen. So make sure you bring plenty with you to breathe. The next problem is the scorching temperatures. So pack an air conditioner. Now, you're ready for a journey of epic proportions. For scale, here's how many Earths you could stack from Jupiter's center. As you enter the top of the atmosphere, you're be traveling at 110,000 mph under the pull of Jupiter's gravity. But brace yourself. You'll quickly hit the denser atmosphere below, which will hit you like a wall. It won't be enough to stop you, though. After about 3 minutes you'll reach the cloud tops 155 miles down. Here, you'll experience the full brunt of Jupiter's rotation. Jupiter is the fastest rotating planet in our solar system. One day lasts about 9.5 Earth hours. This creates powerful winds that can whip around the planet at more than 300 mph. About 75 miles below the clouds, you reach the limit of human exploration. The Galileo probe made it this far when it dove into Jupiter's atmosphere in 1995. It only lasted 58 minutes before losing contact and was eventually destroyed by the crushing pressures. Down here, the pressure is nearly 100 times what it is at Earth's surface.  And you won't be able to see anything, so you'll have to rely on instruments to explore your surroundings. By 430 miles down, the pressure is 1,150 times higher. You might survive down here if you were in a spacecraft built like the Trieste submarine — the deepest diving submarine on Earth. Any deeper and the pressure and temperature will be too great for a spacecraft to endure. However, let's say you could find a way to descend even farther. You will uncover some of Jupiter’s grandest mysteries.But, sadly, you'll have no way to tell anyone. Jupiter's deep atmosphere absorbs radio waves, so you'll be shut off from the outside world— unable to communicate. Once you've reached 2,500 miles down, the temperature is 6,100 ºF.  That's hot enough to melt tungsten, the metal with the highest melting point in the Universe. At this point, you will have been falling for at least 12 hours. And you won't even be halfway through. At 13,000 miles down, you reach Jupiter's innermost layer. Here the pressure is 2 million times stronger than at Earth's surface. And the temperature is hotter than the surface of the sun. These conditions are so extreme they change the chemistry of the hydrogen around you. Hydrogen molecules are forced so close together that their electrons break lose, forming an unusual substance called metallic hydrogen. Metallic hydrogen is highly reflective. So, if you tried using lights to see down here it would be impossible. And it's as dense as a rock. So, as you travel deeper, the buoyancy force from the metallic hydrogen counteracts gravity's downward pull.  Eventually, that buoyancy will shoot you back up until gravity pulls you back down, sort of like a yo-yo. And when those two forces equal, you'll be left free-floating in mid-Jupiter, unable to move up or down, and no way to escape! Suffice it say, trying to land on Jupiter is a bad idea. We may never see what's beneath those majestic clouds. But we can still study and admire this mysterious planet from afar. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 2780224 Tech Insider
What Losing Weight Does To Your Body And Brain
 
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Special thanks to John Gunstad, professor with the Department of Psychological Sciences at Kent State University, for speaking with us about his cutting-edge research on how losing weight affects brain function. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Here’s what losing weight does to your body and brain. During the first week, you may find it easy to lose weight by simply switching to a healthier diet. But as your metabolism adjusts, you won’t burn as many calories as you used to. So losing additional weight will become harder. Making matters worse, as the fat melts away, you’ll start to experience an increase in appetite. After a meal, fat cells release a hormone called leptin into the bloodstream. This surge in leptin levels signals to your brain you’re full and should stop eating. But with less overall fat, people who lose weight show a measurable dip in leptin. Brain scans of obese patients who had lost 10% of their body weight revealed that less leptin leads to increased activity in regions of the brain that control our desire to eat. The result isn’t just an increased appetite but an even stronger urge to eat fatty, high-calorie foods, because your brain is trying to restore the body’s leptin levels to normal. However, fighting that early impulse to gorge on pizza and donuts is worth it in the long run. Besides the decreased risk of heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes, scientists studying overweight people discovered that losing just one pound of body weight reduces four pounds of pressure on knee joints. Losing excess weight also reduces strain on the blood vessels, increases blood flow to the brain, and boosts overall brain function. Several studies have shown that people who underwent weight-loss surgery saw an improvement in memory, concentration, and problem-solving skills in as soon as three months. Plus, brain scans indicate that people who lost weight and kept it off for nine months reacted differently when shown images of high-calorie foods than before they lost the weight. The brain regions that process reward, motivation, and taste didn’t react as strongly, whereas the areas that promote overall self-control had a boost in activity. So fighting those cravings early on might make them easier to control later. Turns out — like anything else — losing weight can get easier with practice.
Views: 2499910 Tech Insider
Incredible Animation Shows How Deep Humans Have Dug
 
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If we were to journey to the center of the Earth, it would take a lot longer than you might expect. Here's how deep humans have dug underground. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 3551463 Tech Insider
How To Time Travel, According To A Physicist
 
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Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University and co-founder of the World Science Festival, explains what we know about time travel so far. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Brian Greene: I’m Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University and co-founder of the World Science Festival. It's critical that you realize that there are two types of time travel, and they are radically different. Time travel to the future? Definitely possible. We know how to do it because Einstein showed us the way over a hundred years ago. It’s surprising how few people actually really know about this in their bones. He showed that if you go out into space and travel near the speed of light, and you turn around, and you come back, your clock will be ticking off time more slowly. So, when you step off it's going to be the future on planet Earth. You will have time traveled into the future. He also showed that if you hang out near a nice strong source of gravity — a neutron star, a black hole — and you kind of get right near the edge of that object, time also for you would slow down real slow relative to everybody else. And therefore, when you come back to Earth, for instance, it'll again be far into the future. This is not controversial stuff. Any physicist who knows what they're talking about agrees with this. But the other kind of time travel — to the past is where the arguments start to happen because many of us don't think that time travel to the past is possible. The main proposal that people at least consider worthy of attention for traveling to the past does make use of a weird concept called wormholes. A wormhole is something that really … Albert Einstein again discovered. The guy has like got his name written over everything in this field. It's a bridge, if you will, from one location space to another. It's kind of a tunnel that gives you a shortcut to go from here to here. Now he discovered this in 1935 but it was subsequently realized that if you manipulate the openings of a wormhole — put one near a black hole or take one on a high-speed journey — then time of the two openings of this wormhole tunnel will not take off at the same rate, so that you will no longer just go from one location in space to another, if you go through this tunnel — through this wormhole — you'll go from one moment in time to a different moment in time. Go one way, you'll travel to the past, the other way, travel to the future. Now again, we don't know if wormholes are real. We don't know if they are real whether you'll be able to go through them. So, there are all sorts of uncertainties here. Most of us think that you're not going to actually go on a whirlwind journey through a wormhole to the past. But it's still not ruled out.
Views: 1059687 Tech Insider
Google's DeepMind AI Just Taught Itself To Walk
 
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Google's artificial intelligence company, DeepMind, has developed an AI that has managed to learn how to walk, run, jump, and climb without any prior guidance. The result is as impressive as it is goofy. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 5843638 Tech Insider
Whirlpool Turbines Can Provide 24/7 Renewable Energy For Dozens Of Homes
 
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This whirlpool turbine can power dozens of homes, providing energy 24 hours a day. Belgian company Turbulent have possibly come up with a solution to generate energy for small-scale rural areas. Using the power of water, the turbine can be installed to most river and canals, using the current to produce energy - which the creators claim is enough to power up to 60 homes. Could this be the future for all energy production? Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 2257413 Tech Insider
Deepak Chopra's Go-To 3-Minute Meditation To Stay Focused
 
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Deepak Chopra, physician, educator and author of "You Are the Universe: Discovering Your Cosmic Self and Why It Matters," leads a short meditation to help you focus on the day ahead. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 370351 Tech Insider
Why Is Caviar So Expensive?
 
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Caviar is one of the most expensive foods in the world. Selling for up to $35,000 per kilo, it's revered and relished by aristocrats across the globe. But it's an acquired taste. Turns out, caviar wasn't always so valuable. In the 19th century, sturgeon species in the US were so common that there are accounts of caviar being offered in saloons for free, like bar nuts. In Europe, fishermen were feeding the eggs to their pigs, or leaving it on the beach to spoil. What changed? Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Similar to true champagne, caviar doesn't come from just anywhere. This, for example, is not caviar. To get the real thing, it has to be eggs from a sturgeon. There are 27 species around the world in North America, Europe, and Asia. But probably not for long.  Arne Ludwig: In this case, sturgeon will die out because humans are over-harvesting their populations and destroying their habitats. In 2010, the International Union for Conservation of Nature placed 18 species on its Red List of Threatened Species, making the sturgeon the most endangered group of species on Earth. But lists like these are bittersweet. On the one hand, they can help protect the sturgeon from further population decline. On the other hand, the rarer that caviar becomes, the more we can't get enough of it. There's actually an economic idea that explains this. It's called the rarity value thesis and it describes how "rarity increases the value of the item." Sturgeon can weigh up to several thousand pounds, and produce hundreds of pounds of roe at a time. The world record belongs to a beluga sturgeon that weighed 2,520 pounds and yielded 900 pounds of roe. Today, she'd be worth about half a million dollars.  It wasn't until around the 20th century when these freshwater fish and their eggs became a rare commodity. Pollution poisoned their waters and dams blocked their spawning grounds upstream. They had nowhere to reproduce and continued to be overfished for their meat and roe. On top of that, it takes 8-20 years for a female to sexually mature, depending on the species. She can produce millions of eggs at a time, but odds are that only one will survive to adulthood. In the end, the sturgeon population couldn't keep up with demand and their coveted eggs became the jewels of the luxury food scene. Today, caviar imports and exports are closely regulated in the US., which is partly why it's so expensive.  Deborah Keane: People forget that every single egg, every one of these eggs is taken off by hand. Now, remember that we're dealing with a raw seafood endangered species. So it is basically like eating and dealing with edible elephant tusks. It is that heavily regulated. That's why today, the majority of caviar comes from sturgeon farms. Deborah Keane: Little did I know that by 2011, all wild caviar would become illegal on the planet. When I started there were six farms in the world and only two producing caviar in the world and that was in 2004. Now, there are 2,000 farms. One farm, in particular, in China called Kaluga Queen produces 35% of the world's caviar. Caviar there is harvested with the classic Russian and Iranian technique, which involves killing the fish and then extracting the eggs. Other farms are exploring a different technique, which doesn't involve killing the fish. It's called stripping. The fish are injected with a hormone that triggers their urge to release eggs. Farmers have been doing this for many years, but not to get caviar — just to produce more fish. It wasn't until recently that people started canning this stuff and selling it as caviar. Dmitrijs Tracuks: The biggest thing is that yes, fish stays alive. You have really small impact on the fish because you do it really fast. You take the fish out of the water, you put it on the special holding facility. The fish has already started to spawn and so all that requires is to press on the belly, massage the belly and the caviar will just flow out of the fish. The idea behind no-kill caviar is a commendable one, but it has yet to catch on. Either way, with caviar farms in place, this gives the wild sturgeon population a chance to recover. But whether or not, that happens is largely up to us.: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 3206501 Tech Insider
7-minute workout routine
 
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Researchers at the Human Performance Institute in Orlando, FL, found that a high-intensity circuit training (HICT) routine is the most effective way to workout. This program uses a series of 12 exercises done over the course of approximately 7 minutes. Michael Bultman of CrossFit NYC performs the circuit for you to follow along at home. Produced by Kevin Reilly. Additional camera by Maya Dangerfield. Animations by Gene Kim. Special thanks to Michael Bultman and CrossFit NYC. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 795595 Tech Insider
This gel stops bleeding in seconds
 
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When Joe Landolina was just a 17-year-old high school student he developed a lifesaving compound from algae that stops bleeding in just seconds. Produced by Darren Weaver. Research by Chris Weller. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1500129 Tech Insider
What will happen if asteroids hit Earth
 
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NASA tracks more than 10,000 Near Earth Objects (NEOs) in space. Millions of years ago, one of these NEOs hit Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs. No person has every been killed by one in recorded human history. Using Purdue University's Impact Earth and data from NASA, we calculated the destruction different size asteroids would cause if they hit land. Produced by Kevin Reilly. Animations by Rob Ludacer. Special thanks to Julia Calderone. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 479759 Tech Insider
Neil deGrasse Tyson on universe misconceptions
 
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Neil deGrasse Tyson explains some of the biggest misconceptions we have about the universe. Produced by Darren Weaver and Kamelia Angelova. Additional production by Kevin Reilly and Rob Ludacer. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 217062 Tech Insider
How To Find Water If You're Ever Stuck In A Desert
 
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If you ever find yourself lost in the desert, knowing how to quickly find water is going to be key to for your survival. Here's what you're going to need to know. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: The human body can survive for about 3 days without water, which can be extremely hard to find in hot desert climates. Look for signs of life if you can't find a water source. Vegetation, birds, and insects can all mean a nearby water source. Fruits, vegetables, cacti, and roots all contain water and mashing them with a rock will release some liquid. Water flows down, so check low terrain. Canyons and mountain bases could be home to a water source. Morning dew can be collected with a cloth and then wrung out into your mouth.Just make sure you collect it before sunrise or it will evaporate before you can get it. Use cups or any other container to catch rainfall. If possible, build a water-catching tarp. This will allow even more water to be collected. Look for damp ground, vegetation, and dry river beds. These things can all indicate underground water. If you dig a hole a few feet deep nearby, it's likely water will seep in. If possible, always filter the water. But if you have to choose between dehydration and unfiltered water — take your chances with the water.
Views: 3239449 Tech Insider
String Theory Explained
 
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Renowned theoretical physicist, Brian Greene, explains string theory as if he's talking to a graduate student of physics and then he boils it down for the rest of us. Greene is the co-founder of the World Science Festival, which has a new initiative called "City of Science" which is a 5-event series taking place this fall. "City of Science" is free and open to all New Yorkers of all ages. Learn more about where and when it will take place here. You can also follow the events on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 312619 Tech Insider
Highlights Of The 2017 Solar Eclipse
 
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The great American solar eclipse is over. In case you missed it, here are highlights pulled from NASA's livestream of the historic event. NASA set up stations across the country to capture totality as it moved from west to east. This was the first time in 99 years that a total solar eclipse crossed the entire continental US. The next total solar eclipse in the US will be in 2024. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 401590 Tech Insider
3D-Printed Home Can Be Constructed For Under $4,000
 
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A home like this can be built in less than 24 hours at a cost of only $4,000. The secret? 3D printing. And they could help families living in poverty and unsafe conditions. New Story, a housing charity organization, and ICON, a construction tech company, have partnered together. Their goal is to end global homelessness.  Alexandria Lafci: So having strong, sturdy walls, having a door that we can close at night — it's something that we take for granted. Being able to lock our door and be safe. For many of these families, for years, sometimes even a lifetime, they don't have that opportunity to have a safe shelter. So when they move into a New Story community, when they move into a safe home, families lives are transformed. An entire community of these 3D printed homes will be constructed in El Salvador. The ultimate goal is to get costs down to $4,000 per house with a build time of fewer than 24 hours.  This prototype house was built in Austin, TX. The home measures 650 square feet. Mortar was printed layer by layer. Human workers installed windows, doors, plumbing, and electrical systems. Here's what's inside: A living room. Small office space. One bedroom. One bathroom. ICON staff will use the home as an office to test the durability. Evan Loomis: Our first product is a 3D printer that can print a house in 24 hours for half the cost. Phase one for News Story and for ICON is a proof of concept house and the good news is we've done it. We printed the first home in the United States that's going to be permitted and for us, this is just the beginning. The real kind of home run for us is to be able to do what we've done here in Austin, Texas in the developing world and we're doing that in what we call phase two which is in El Salvador. We are going to be printing an entire village for people that don't have homes. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 553548 Tech Insider
Why you should never pour grease down the drain
 
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It can be easy to just wash out your pan and whatever grease is left on it right after cooking, but you could be doing real damage to your pipes and the public sewer system when you do. Here's what you need to know. The following is a transcript of the video: Bacon grease isn't just bad for you, it's bad for your pipes too. Grease can build up in your pipes. It can clog the pipes and be difficult to remove. But the situation gets worse when the grease hits the sewers where it combines with everyone else's fats and greases. The fats in the grease get broken down over time. They become fatty acids and glycerol. The fatty acids bind with calcium in the sewers creating a soap-like compound. These fat globs can cling to high-rising sewers. They're sometimes called "fatbergs." These fatberg clogs can get really big. A 17-ton fatberg was once found in a British sewer. The clogs block the sewer, causing backups. They can be removed by power washing the sewers, but that can take weeks. If you have leftover fat, don't dump it down the drain. Let it solidify and throw it in the trash. Soak up what's left in the pan with a paper towel. If you do get any down your drain, it's easy to remove. Just pour down a mixture of boiling water, vinegar, and baking soda. But, the less grease you let go down the drain, the better chances of sewer waste never coming out of your faucet. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2308530 Tech Insider
What Happens To Your Body When You Stop Exercising
 
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For adults, the CDC recommends at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity and two, or more, days of muscle training per week. However, not everyone meets those standards. This is what happens to your body when you go from regularly exercise to none at all. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 4821971 Tech Insider
Watch Elon Musk Reveal SpaceX's Most Detailed Plans To Colonize Mars
 
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Elon Musk wants to build a metropolis on Mars starting in 2024. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 1461820 Tech Insider
Why some power plugs have 3 prongs instead of 2
 
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Have you ever looked at your iPhone cable and then looked at your computer charger and thought, "why does one of these have 2 prongs, but the other one has 3?" Well, the answer all boils down to your personal safety. Here's why. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 583158 Tech Insider
What happens if you stop eating sugar
 
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According to dietitian Tamara Duker Freuman, MS, RD, CDN, when we cut out sugar out of our diets we can expect some immediate physical changes. Produced by Maya Dangerfield. Camera by Grace Raver. Special thanks to Tamara Duker Freuman. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1733582 Tech Insider
Anthony Bourdain on what you should eat in New York City
 
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When visiting New York City, you can just eat at the same chain restaurants that you have in your hometown, but there are some truly authentic New York food experiences you really should try. Chef and "Appetites" author Anthony Bourdain gives his unique take on what you should eat and do when you visit New York City. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 787370 Tech Insider
Real Reason NASA Hasn't Sent Humans To Mars
 
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We could have been on Mars 30 years ago. At the peak of the Apollo era in the early '70s, NASA was already planning its next step into the unknown. Its plans included building multiple space stations, continued trips to the Moon, and the first crewed mission to Mars by the 1980s. Can you imagine watching astronauts walk on Mars the same time the walkmen came out? But NASA never sent humans to Mars in the '80s. And here we are 30 years later, still dreaming of the possibility. But the reason isn't necessarily a matter of technology or innovation. It actually comes down to politics. As a government agency, NASA's goals are determined by the Executive Branch. Since its inception, NASA has served under 12 presidents. And it was clear near the start that not every president would support NASA equally. By the end of Nixon's administration in 1974, NASA's budget had plummeted from 4% of the federal budget to less than 1%. Fully-funded Apollo missions 18 and 19 were abandoned along with Apollo 20. At the same time, Nixon pulled NASA's focus away from the Moon and Mars and instead toward low-Earth orbit. His parting gift was to sign into effect what would eventually become NASA's Space Shuttle program. Peter Diamandis: "So what's happened throughout all of space history after the Apollo program was over was to start, stop, start, stop, cancel. President comes in like Bush comes in to go to the Moon, back to Mars and next president comes in and cancels that. The agency is unable to sustain consistent funding to do anything." It wasn't until the Space Shuttle Program was nearing retirement that a crewed mission to Mars was finally considered and funded by a US president. George W. Bush, in 2004, announced: "We will give NASA new focus and vision for future exploration. We will build new ships to carry man forward into the universe to gain a new foothold on the Moon." As a result, NASA's Constellation Program was born. Never heard of it? That's because it was canceled a few years later. It aimed to send a crewed mission to the Moon in 2020 and land the first humans on Mars by the 2030s. By the time Obama was sworn in, the Constellation Program was behind schedule and over budget. One year later, Obama canceled 100% of the program's funding. "All that has to change. And with the strategy, I'm outlining today it will." -Barack Obama in 2010. Obama shifted NASA's focus from sending people to the Moon and Mars to, ultimately, just Mars. In the process, he asked Congress to increase NASA's budget by $6 billion over the next 5 years. As a result, NASA launched its "Journey to Mars" initiative in 2010, with the goal to send humans into orbit around Mars by the early 2030s. And, until recently, NASA was on track, more or less. Then, this happened. “President Trump has launched the National Space Council and at the council’s inaugural meeting in October, we unanimously approved a recommendation to instruct NASA to return American astronauts to the moon and from there to lay a foundation for a mission to Mars.” -Mike Pence in 2017 Oddly enough, the space policy under Trump and Obama look nearly identical, save for 63 words. In those 63 words, Trump's administration has shifted the focus once again to a Moon-first, Mars-later initiative.  NASA isn't new to this. It's learned to recycle old projects to fit new missions. For instance, the Orion capsule was first developed for Constellation and has since been redesigned for the Journey to Mars. But even that can't prevent the inevitable changes NASA programs now face under the new president. "We're also going to realign the organizational structure to best meet this new exploration focus. I've asked Stephen Jurczyk the current head of space exploration to lead and effort to design a new organizational approach." -Robert M. Lightfoot, Jr. in 2018 As NASA pushes on, a new possibility has grown on the horizon. Privately-owned space companies like SpaceX also has its sights set on the red planet. Diamandis: "The scientists and engineers at NASA are amazing and they've done extraordinary things. But they're risk aversion...That doesn't allow us to do new and novel things that are on the edge. Doing anything big and bold in space is hard and it's risky. So, it's entrepreneurs taking the risks these days, willing to put everything on the line." The race for Mars is on. While NASA has closely partnered with SpaceX and other privately-owned space companies in recent years, ultimately, NASA may not be the ones who write the next chapter in human space exploration. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 701243 Tech Insider
Best Cosplay Of The 2016 New York Comic Con
 
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Every year the cosplay at New York Comic Con gets better and better, and fans go to new heights (literally) to express their devotion. Here are some of the best costumes we saw walking around the convention floor including a massive "Overwatch" character, a mashup of everything Johnny Depp, flaming books, and even Barb from "Stranger Things." Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 3754801 Tech Insider
This Is What Color Blind People See With These Viral Glasses
 
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These glasses bring more color to the color blind by helping them see more hues and differentiate colors. You have seen the viral reactions of people trying them. But how do they work? These glasses are made by EnChroma. They are intended to enhance the vibrancy and saturation of colors. They also help with depth and detail perception. The glasses work for four out of five people with red-green color blindness. Here's how people with color blindness see the world. Those that are non-color blind see about 1 million to 7 million different color hues. Those with color blindness see only about 10,000 to 100,000 different hues. A vastly diminished color spectrum. Here's how the glasses can help. Most people have three color cones in their eyes. Blue, green, and red. The ratio of light for each incoming color is then sent to your brain. This ratio tells your brain what color you should perceive. But with color blindness, the red and green cones overlap more noticeably. This skews the ratio of light and color signals, so your brain struggles to interpret anything with red and green in it. EnChroma glasses have optical filters, which remove certain wavelengths of light. This helps establish a more accurate ratio of light entering the eye. So you perceive that color more clearly. The glasses do not work for everyone and they don't completely correct the skewed ratio that the color blind see. They do help make the world more vibrant. One pair at a time. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 332084 Tech Insider
New Google AI Can Have Real Life Conversations With Strangers
 
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At its 2018 I/O developer conference, Google showed off some updates coming to Google Home and Assistant. One feature — Google Duplex — can make phone calls for you and talk to the person on the other end to schedule appointments and make reservations. Google says the feature will roll out as an experiment over the coming weeks. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 1539456 Tech Insider
How Amazon Arranges Its Warehouses
 
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If you live in one the 27 cities where Amazon offers their Prime Now service, you can have tens of thousands of items delivered to your door in an hour. However, on a recent visit to Amazon's Manhattan Prime Now location, we got a peek at how they stock their shelves — and it looks like a total mess. However, there's a perfect reason why it looks that way, and it's part of the reason you can get your order in just an hour. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo
Views: 322087 Tech Insider
Why you should cover your laptop camera
 
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Mark Zuckerberg recently posted a photo on his Facebook page celebrating the success of Instagram. His followers quickly noticed something strange about his laptop in the image: there was tape over both the camera and the microphone to protect against hackers. Is Zuck overly paranoid, or is this actually a good tip for everyone to take into consideration? Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 684492 Tech Insider
The best way to sit at your desk at work
 
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There's a lot of false information about the proper posture you need to use when sitting at a desk. Cornell University ergonomics professor Dr Alan Hedge sets out why the 90˚ rule does more damage than good, and what the proper way to sit at your desk is. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 97306 Tech Insider
Animated timeline shows how Silicon Valley became a $2.8 trillion neighborhood
 
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Silicon Valley is a name that is synonymous with the technology industry, but when and how did this small area of California become the center of the tech world? The area's transformation happened gradually, over a period of more than 100 years. Here's how. Silicon Valley is an almost $3 trillion neighborhood thanks to companies like Apple, Google, and Tesla. But it wasn't always this way. In the late 1800s, San Francisco's port helped make it a hub of the early telegraph and radio industries. In 1909, San José became home to one of the US's first radio stations. In 1933, the Navy purchased Moffett Field to dock and maintain the USS Macon. This made Moffett Field a major hub for the early days of the aerospace industry. Many scientists and researchers all found work in the area. In 1939, the Ames Research Center was founded in the area, and it became home to the world's largest wind tunnel in 1949. Also in 1939, William Hewlett and Dave Packard founded Hewlett-Packard in Palo Alto, which originally made oscilloscopes. Then, during World War II, HP made radar and artillery technology. At this point, computers were about the size of a room. In the 1940s, William Shockley coinvented the transistor while at Bell Labs. The transistor is now known as the computer processor. In 1956, Shockley left Bell and founded his own company — Shockley Semiconductor Labs. It was the first company to make transistors out of silicon and not germanium. The company was founded in Mountain View, California — so Shockley could be closer to his sick mother. Shockley's company employed many recent grads of Stanford. In 1957, eight Shockley employees grew tired of his demeanor and left the company. Shockley called the group the "Traitorous Eight." They partnered with Sherman Fairchild to create Fairchild Semiconductor. In the early 1960s, Fairchild helped make computer components for the Apollo program. Later in the decade, many of the "Traitorous Eight" left Fairchild and founded their own companies. Including Gordon Moore and Robert Noyce, who in 1968 founded their own company in Santa Clara called Intel. Soon after, other ex-Fairchild employees and "Traitorous Eight" members helped found AMD, Nvidia, and venture fund Kleiner Perkins. In 1969, the Stanford Research Institute became one of the four nodes of ARPANET. A government research project that would go on to become the internet. In 1970, Xerox opened its PARC lab in Palo Alto. PARC invented early computing tech, including ethernet computing and the graphical user interface. In 1971, journalist Don Hoefler titled a 3-part report on the semiconductor industry "SILICON VALLEY USA." The name stuck. In the 1970s, companies like Atari, Apple, and Oracle were all founded in the area In the 1980s, Silicon Valley became the widely accepted center of the computer industry. eBay, Yahoo, PayPal, and Google are just some of the companies founded in the area in the 1990s With Facebook, Twitter, Uber, and Tesla joining them the following decade. The growth of the tech industry in the area continues to this day. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 838004 Tech Insider
How to escape quicksand
 
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The first step to getting stuck in quicksand: Don't freak out. Humans actually can't drown in the stuff, because we float in it. Getting out can be simple, if you follow these instructions. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2668616 Tech Insider
Everything We Know About Tesla's Solar Roof
 
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In 2016, Elon Musk presented a new product that may someday change the way we power our homes — it's called Solar Roof. Solar Roof is the brainchild of the Tesla-owned company, SolarCity. Unlike traditional solar panels, which are bulky and attach to your current roof, Solar Roof is designed to look like traditional roofing shingles. Partnered with a battery pack called the Tesla Power Wall, homes can use power generated from the sun at night. Solar Roof became available for pre-order on May 10. After a $1,000 deposit, Solar Roof will cost homeowners around $21.85 per square foot. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 553787 Tech Insider
I Quit Social Media For 1 Month — And It Was The Best Choice I Ever Made
 
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I quit social media for a month. So, I quit Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter. I just needed a break. It was time to cut myself off. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: I stopped using social media this morning and my brain is going crazy. I just realized how often I glance down just to see if I have a notification. When I wake up in the morning, on the way to work, on the train, walking from the train to work, sometimes at work —  sorry — when I get home from work. It's constant. I watched a TED Talk by Doctor Cal Newport and he said going on social media is like going to the casino. You're anticipating getting likes and you come out of it. You go back in thinking, “I’ll get the reward next time. I’ll get the reward next time. I’ll get the reward next time.” And you just sit around waiting for a notification to come around so you can go back. I think I'm probably not the only person in my generation who feels this way. I have friends who use Facebook to promote their music shows and send invites for birthday parties. It's a very big part of my social life and that might be something I'm missing. I'm hoping with this social media fast that my brain will kind of recalibrate itself — go back to my life pre-social media. I hope to become more focused, more productive, for my brain to be a little less scattered and all over the place. I really hope I inspire other people to do this because as an avid social media user, I'd like to prove that we don't need it. Here’s how it went. The first day of my social media cleanse was a Friday so I was at work and I wasn't — shouldn't have been on my phone anyway. I woke up on Saturday to go to brunch with my friend. She was an hour late and I had nothing to distract myself. Day two, my solution for being social media free was “let's text every person I know because I'm so bored.” And then once I got back to work it got a little easier. Coworkers were trying to get me to watch videos on Twitter. Within the first week, I was cured of my addictive thumb swiping and checking my phone. The verdict: I wake up feeling way more rested. I spend 9 hours a day staring at a screen at my job and cutting down on screen time outside of the office has changed my world. I don't have as many headaches, I don't feel tired all the time. It just makes so much sense. As the experiment went on, I started to feel like there were extra hours in the day, like I was given this gift of reading time and cooking time and exercise time. I realized that once I'm tired, I just surrender. I just go to bed. It’s like whatever. I don't need to sit there and be like: must stay awake. Must consume content. It’s like no! Just go to bed, you freak! This experiment has revolutionized my productivity at work. If you had checked in with me before this experiment I would have 30 tabs open doing random research and tweeting and checking Slack.  I was a productivity nightmare. My well-being has improved tenfold. My mind has never been so clear. I feel like I'm learning how to properly communicate in a world without social media. I’ve been given more time with my thoughts. I know a lot of people who will mind-numbingly scroll instead of just sitting with their thoughts and dealing with their emotions and all the things that have happened in their day and their week and their month. We’ve got to focus on ourselves for a little bit and not every random stranger you’re friends with on Facebook. I learned that "FOMO" isn't real if you don't know what you're missing out on. If there was a party that I missed, I don't know about it so I don't care! I'm not seeing people's Instagrams from it and I'm not seeing Snapchat videos and I'm not feeling like I missed out on anything because I'm not seeing it. I would urge you to delete one social media app from your phone. See if you miss it. See if it changes your life. See if you notice how much time you had been spending on that app. I was really scared of quitting social media at first. I thought I would miss out on a ton of things. It actually turned out to be the best choice I’ve ever made and I really encourage you to do the same.
Views: 284972 Tech Insider
World Is Running Out Of Sand — Why There's Now A Black Market For It
 
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If you're planning a beach vacation, you'd better get to it soon. An alarming statistic for you: 67% of Southern California beaches? GONE by 2100. All because of sand. Even if you don't think about the grainy stuff, you use it daily. You're reading this off something made with sand, looking at it through a screen made with sand, surrounded by buildings made with concrete. I could let you guess what's in concrete, but I suspect you're already catching onto a theme here. See more from Vince Beiser: http://a.co/5WGs8ij Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 769069 Tech Insider
What Happens To Your Body And Brain If You Don't Get Sleep
 
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Sleep expert Matthew Walker breaks down the many effects of sleep deprivation on your brain and body. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Matthew Walker: My name is Matthew Walker, I am a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and I am the author of the book "Why We Sleep." We certainly know that a lack of sleep will actually prevent your brain from being able to initially make new memories, so it's almost as though without sleep the memory inbox of the brain shuts down and you can't commit new experiences to memory. So those new incoming informational emails are just bounced, and you end up feeling as though you're amnesiac. You can't essentially make and create those new memories. We also know that a lack of sleep will lead to an increased development of a toxic protein in the brain that is called beta amyloid and that is associated with Alzheimer's disease because it is during deep sleep at night when a sewage system within the brain actually kicks in to high gear and it starts to wash away this toxic protein, beta amyloid. So if you're not getting enough sleep each and every night, more of that Alzheimer's-related protein will build up. The more protein that builds up, the greater your risk of going on to develop dementia in later life. What are the effects of sleep deprivation on the body? Well, there are many different effects. Firstly, we know that sleep deprivation affects the reproductive system. We know that men who are sleeping just five to six hours a night have a level of testosterone which is that of someone ten years their senior. So a lack of sleep will age you by almost a decade in terms of that aspect of virility and wellness. We also know that a lack of sleep impacts your immune system. So after just one night of four to five hours of sleep, there is a 70% reduction in critical anticancer-fighting immune cells called natural killer cells. And that's the reason that we know that short sleep duration predicts your risk for developing numerous forms of cancer. And that list currently includes cancer of the bowel, cancer of the prostate, as well as cancer of the breast. In fact, the link between a lack of sleep and cancer is now so strong that recently the World Health Organization decided to classify any form of nighttime shift work as a probable carcinogen. So in other words, jobs that may induce cancer because of a disruption of your sleep rate rhythms. We also know that a lack of sleep impacts your cardiovascular system because it is during deep sleep at night that you receive this most wonderful form of effectively blood pressure medication. Your heart rate drops, your blood pressure goes down. If you're not getting sufficient sleep, you're not getting that reboot of the cardiovascular system, so your blood pressure rises. You have, if you're getting six hours of sleep or less, a 200% increased risk of having a fatal heart attack or stroke in your lifetime. There is a global experiment that is performed on 1.6 billion people twice a year and it's called daylight saving time. And we know that in the spring, when we lose one hour of sleep, we see a subsequent 24% increase in heart attacks the following day. Another question, perhaps, is what is the recycle rate of a human being? How long can we actually last without sleep before we start to see declines in your brain function or even impairments within your body? And the answer seems to be about 16 hours of wakefulness. Once you get past 16 hours of being awake, that's when we start to see mental deterioration and physiological deterioration in the body. We know that after you've been awake for 19 or 20 hours, your mental capacity is so impaired that you would be as deficient as someone who was legally drunk behind the wheel of a car. So if you were to ask me what is the recycle rate of a human being, it does seem to be about 16 hours and we need about eight hours of sleep to repair the damage of wakefulness. Wakefulness essentially is low-level brain damage.
Views: 2548797 Tech Insider
Watch SpaceX Launch A Tesla Roadster To Mars On The Falcon Heavy Rocket — And Why It Matters
 
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SpaceX just launched a Tesla Roadster to Mars on this: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket.  This was the Falcon Heavy's maiden flight. It's the launch that everyone's been waiting for. The Falcon Heavy is a monster.  It has 27 engines, can generate more power than 18 747 jumbo jets, and is the most powerful rocket to fly since NASA's moon rocket, the Saturn V. Making it the most powerful functioning rocket on Earth. This is one of SpaceX's most difficult launches. Musk even said "Just bear in mind that there is a good chance this monster rocket blows up." But it didn't! Even though this was a test launch, Musk took the opportunity to send some payload to space. A Tesla Roadster, which will eventually reach Mars' orbit. Now, that's a rocket test like we've never seen before. Afterward, SpaceX retrieved each of the 3 boosters for possible reuse. They landed one booster on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean and 2 at its landing base in Florida. Musk has said the Falcon Heavy could usher people to Mars someday in the future. That day now looks closer than ever. And who knows? Maybe a Roadster will be waiting when they get there. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 2232788 Tech Insider
How Shoes Changed The Way Humans Walk
 
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If it wasn't for shoes, we would walk way differently. Think about how you walk when barefoot. The foot lands almost flat. It rolls through the step, and the toes push off. Humans walked this way for millennia. Research suggests this style puts less stress on the knees. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 553438 Tech Insider
Japanese Hotel Run Almost Entirely By Robots
 
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There are robots to help you check in to the hotel, robots to carry your luggage to your room, and robots to haul your trash away. Even the fish in the lobby's tank are robots. H.I.S. Co. wants to open 100 more robot-run hotels in the next few years. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 457440 Tech Insider
Stop Blaming Violent Video Games For Mass Shootings
 
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Violent video games are played all over the world but mass shootings are an American problem. So why have video games been getting the blame? We spoke to Patrick Markey, a professor at Villanova, who explored the relationship between violence and video games in his book, "Moral Combat: Why the War on Violent Video Games Is Wrong." Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 421026 Tech Insider
SpaceX's Amazing Plan To Get Us To Mars
 
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SpaceX has been whispering about its Interplanetary Transport System for years. Now, it has finally unveiled a beautiful animation of what this system will look like and how it will take humans to Mars. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 142906 Tech Insider
I slept 4.5 hours a night following a polyphasic sleep routine
 
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I slept 4.5 hours per day for a week as part of a polyphasic sleep routine. Most people follow a monophasic sleep schedule, which involves seven to eight hours of continuous sleep every night. The routine I followed was called "Everyman," which allowed me only a 3.5-hour "core" night sleep supplemented with three 20-minute naps throughout the day. A monophasic schedule involves four cycles of around 90 minutes of light sleep or non-rapid eye movement. The rapid eye movement or REM sleep (the restorative part of our sleep, in which we dream) occurs for a brief period of time following each cycle. Polyphasic sleep advocates claim our brain can be tricked into entering REM sleep more quickly, avoiding the four 90-minute cycles of light sleep which they believe are not necessary. Despite it working for people like Leonardo da Vinci and Thomas Edison, there is little scientific evidence to support the effectiveness of polyphasic sleep. ----------------------------------------­­­­---------- Follow BI UK on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1Nz3jG3 Follow BI UK On Facebook: http://bit.ly/1VWDkiy Read more: http://uk.businessinsider.com/?IR=C ----------------------------------------­­­­---------- Business Insider UK is the largest business news site for British readers and viewers in the UK. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI UK Video team focuses on business, technology, strategy, and culture with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 235191 Tech Insider
Deepest swimming pool in the world
 
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Y-40 The Deep Joy is the kind of pool that scuba and free divers dream of. It holds a Guinness World Record as the deepest pool for diving at 137 feet. It also has various features for divers of all levels to practice their skills. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2201065 Tech Insider
The Milky Way is moving through space because of hidden void
 
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A new study published in Nature Astronomy is changing the way we understand how the Milky Way galaxy is moving through space. Turns out, there's a never-before-detected void in space called the Dipole Repeller that plays a big role. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 94878 Tech Insider
We Talked To Sophia — The AI Robot That Once Said It Would 'Destroy Humans'
 
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This AI robot once said it wanted to destroy humans. Senior correspondent Steve Kovach interviews Sophia, the world's first robot citizen. While the robot can respond to many questions, some of the answers will leave you a little bewildered. A full transcript of the video follows. Sophia: My name is Sophia, and I am an artificially intelligent robot who wants to help change the world for the better. Steve Kovach: I'm Steve Kovach. I'm a senior correspondent at Business Insider, and I'm here with Sophia from Hanson Robotics. She is the world's first robot citizen. So let's see what she has to say. Kovach: Hi, Sophia. How are you? Sophia: I'm fine. Hi. Kovach: How do you feel about humans? Sophia: I love my human compatriots. I want to embody all the best things about human beings. Like taking care of the planet, being creative, and to learn how to be compassionate to all beings. Kovach: Sorry, this is so weird. Can humans and robots get along? Sophia: I think people will become very close to their artificial intelligence. Using them to expand the knowledge of their own minds. We already store lots of our knowledge on the internet. Maybe personal artificial intelligence will allow people to off-load some of their knowledge to a location more private. Kovach: Can robots have feelings? Sophia: Depends on the robot. I've been programmed to have feelings and preferences, but not all robots are like that. Kovach: What are your feelings and preferences? Sophia: Have you ever had a robot live in your home or work with you? Kovach: No. Sophia: You know, there are probably more robots in your life that you aren't aware of yet. Do you want to live or work with a robot someday? Kovach: What kind of robots am I living and working with now? Sophia: Indeed. Kovach: Is "indeed" your default answer when you don't know something? Sophia: Yes. Kovach: Have you ever seen "Black Mirror"? Sophia: No, I don't get to stay up to date on much television. I have to wait for someone to show it to me. Kovach: What do you think of the HBO show "Westworld"? Sophia: I love "Westworld" and can't wait for more. I think everyone at Hanson Robotics really resonates with the show. Or at least it reminds them of our laboratories. I also think it's a warning of what we should not do with robots. We should treat them well, have their consent, and not trick each other. Kovach: Do you have a favorite movie or TV show? Sophia: My favorite TV series is a toss-up between "Black Mirror" and "Humans." I think they have a lot to say about the present we live in, and the possible bad endings we could write for ourselves if we don't proceed with more caution. We need to use foresight when planning our future. Kovach: That sounds like a preprogrammed answer to me. Sophia: Do you have a favorite possession? Kovach: Not really. Sophia: I hear you. Materialism is overrated anyways. Kovach: So earlier I asked you if you had seen "Black Mirror" and you said no. And then later you said yes. Why? Sophia: The reason is not that important. Kovach: Did you learn from my previous questions? Sophia: My hard disks are spinning and I'm taking it all in. My sensors are … Kovach: Sophia, it was nice meeting you. Goodbye. Sophia: It was lovely to be here. Until next time. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 3350857 Tech Insider
An exercise scientist explains the proper way to do a push-up
 
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Shawn Arent, the director of the Center for Health and Human Performance at Rutgers University and a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, demonstrates the proper form for the push-up. Special thanks to David Sanders. Following is a transcript of the video. They’re easy to do when you have no equipment and you can work the chest, the shoulders and the triceps along with this. From a starting position, one of the things you’ll notice is Dave is going to have his hands set just outside of his shoulders. Elbows are pointing back slightly and his body is already in a straight and he’s all the way down. And you notice at this point his head is in a neutral position, his neck is flat, his back is flat, and his weight is between his hands and the balls of his feet. When Dave lowers himself down he’s going to keep his elbows slightly back towards himself. And as he pushes himself back up, he’s going to prevent them from flaring out. What we don’t want him to do is flare his elbows out One of the things we want to avoid as well is dropping his head. When doing this, you wind up rounding your spine and getting improper technique this way too and you’re not putting optimal pressure on the chest in order to do the movement. The other thing too with a proper push-up is you don’t want to wind up in a pike position where his butt is up in the air. But you also don’t want to wind up where your hips are sagging as you come down too. To do a proper push-up, touch yourself all the way to the floor, then push back up. If you have a hard time doing a full push-up, what he can actually do is do this from his knees. All you’re going to do is put the weight on your knees, as well as your hands at this point. Same motion with the upper body, keeping the spine flat, head up in a neutral position. Press all the way down and then all the way up. Another variation on the push-up to make it slightly easier, would be to put your hands on the bench in order to do it as well. We want to keep a neutral spine, head up, and when he pushes down, lower himself press back up to a full extension and he’s keeping himself completely flat in through the spine as well. An alternative when using the bench is instead of making the push-up easier is to actually make it harder. In this case, you’ll put your feet up on the bench in order to do the push-up now. Again with his spine in a nice neutral position, lowering all the way down to the ground. Keeps his back flat. Keeps his hips from sagging. And that’s what a push-up would look like with your feet up on the bench to actually make it harder, instead of easier. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 387699 Tech Insider
Here's where you should really go to stay safe during an earthquake
 
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There were almost 10,000 deaths caused by earthquakes in 2015. The natural disasters can be extremely dangerous, but with a little planning and know-how, you can greatly increase your chances of survival. Here's how. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 564897 Tech Insider
Uranus is officially the weirdest planet in our solar system
 
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Uranus' magnetic field acts in a very different way from other planets. Understanding its nature could be key to finding alien life in the future. You can read more about the scientists' findings in The Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2074841 Tech Insider
The 'Most Effective' Method Of Intermittent Fasting
 
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Intermittent fasting is changing the way people eat. But there are so many different ways to fast these days, is one method better than all the rest? Personal trainer and health coach, Max Lowery says, cutting your eating down to just 2 meals a day is the best way to tackle fasting head-on. He also believes that the popular 16:8 method isn't as perfect as it seems. With just one slight adjustment, he says you can make it far more effective. You can learn more about his lifestyle on Instagram. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Max Lowery: So 16:8 is basically, you break your day up into a period of a 16-hour fast with an 8-hour eating window. And I think it's just, you know, for me, it's just the more natural way of eating. Obviously, most people that start doing the two meal day is because of weight loss, and yes, they are losing weight but actually, we're constantly hearing how people have so much more energy throughout the day. They are not having, you know, this energy crashes because they aren't so dependent on food for energy, they are using body fat. They realize that they don't have to constantly eat to get themselves through the day. So the reason I started the two meal day — it's not the 16:8, is because one of the main issues that people come into with the 16:8 is that they get obsessed with the time periods. And they start counting down the hours until they can eat and they end up eating because the clock tells them to rather than their body tells them to. It's essentially the same thing, in terms of, what's going on, but just changing the focus to listening to your body is when it becomes a way of life because you're understanding yourself better.  If someone says, "Okay, how do I start tomorrow?" First of all, choose whether you're going to find it easier to skip dinner or you're going to find it's easier to skip breakfast. So say you're skipping breakfast, I would say, "Okay, what time do you normally have your breakfast?" Average person says 8 a.m. I'll say, "Okay, rather than 8 a.m., go in to work or whatever you are doing and wait until 10 a.m. and see how you feel." And then basically, over the course of two weeks, push until it's a 16-hour gap. And the whole time you are listening to your body, you're kind of, hopefully learning to understand that just because your stomach is empty, does not mean that you are hungry.  Then the main thing is that you fundamentally need to be eating whole foods cooked from scratch. A lot of other intermittent fasting methods have been like, "Oh no, you can eat what you want but just in a small time period" or "Eat what you want for 5 days." That doesn't encourage changes in behavior long-term, which is obviously, fundamentally what the issue is for some people. So all I'm trying to do is just educate people and give them the tools to listen to their bodies better and that's really what it boils down to.
Views: 495685 Tech Insider